“Thoughts are the great purveyors of the soul to bring in provision to satisfy its affections”

John Owen, Of the Mortification of Sin in Believers
excerpt from Overcoming Sin and Temptation


From Overcoming Sin and Temptation | Sin aims always at the utmost

“Sin aims at the utmost; every time it rises up to tempt or entice, might it have its own course, it would go out to the utmost sin in that kind. Every unclean thought or glance would be adultery if it could; every covetous desire would be oppression, every thought of unbelief would be atheism, might it grow to its head.”

John Owen, Of the Mortification of Sin in Believers
excerpt from Overcoming Sin and Temptation


From Overcoming Sin and Temptation | Introduction

A few excerpts from the Introduction:

Overcoming Cover

  • “Using classic faculty-psychology categories of the mind, the will, and the affections, Owen consistently attempts to present a holistic perspective of the human person, and this informs his view of sin and sanctification.” (pp. 26-27)
  • “Past faithfulness is not a protection against present dangers.” (p. 30)
  • “…the only hope Owen can promise comes not through further self-examination but by embracing the love and provision of God.” (p. 31)
  • “Owen’s goal is not to have people remain focused on their sin but rather to embrace the redemption accomplished in Christ.” (p. 31)
  • “Christians can be confident about their growth in sanctification and eternal security because they are confident in the God who promises it.” (p. 32)
  • “…rituals and human effort without the Spirit cannot ultimately bring liberation from sin and temptation.” (p. 33)

Looking forward to what’s to come.


Death is a River

“Ah! thou wise man, full of worldly wisdom; thy wisdom will stand thee here, but what wilt thou do in the swellings of Jordan? Philosophy may do well for thee to lean upon whilst thou walkest through this world; but the river is deep, and thou wilt want something more than that. If thou hast not the arm of the Most High to hold thee up in the flood and cheer thee with promises, thou wilt sink, man; with all thy philosophy, thou wilt sink; with all thy learning, thou shalt sink, and be washed into that awful ocean of eternal torment, where thou shalt be forever.” – Charles Spurgeon, in his sermon Christ Crucified.

 

“Now I further saw that betwixt them and the Gate [of Heaven] was a River, but there was no bridge to go over; the River was very deep; at the sight therefore of this River, the pilgrims were much astounded…The pilgrims then began to inquire if there was no other way to the Gate…The pilgrims then, especially Christian, began to despond in his mind, and looked this way and that, but no way could be found by them by which they might escape the River…They then addressed themselves to the water; and entering, Christian began to sink, and crying out to his good friend Hopeful, he said, ‘I sink in deep waters, the billows go over my head, all his waves go over me’…Then said the other, ‘Be of good cheer, my brother, I feel the bottom, and it is good…Be of good cheer, Jesus Christ maketh thee whole.’ And with that, Christian brake out with a loud voice, ‘Oh I see him again! And he tells me, When though passest through the waters, I will be with thee, and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee.’ Then they both took courage, and the enemy was after that as still as a stone, until they were gone over. Christian therefore presently found ground to stand upon; and so it followed that the rest of the River was but shallow. Thus they got over.” – John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress

 

It is Jesus who gets us across this river – this river we will all face – not worldly wisdom, philosophy, or learning, lest we be washed into that awful ocean.

{emphasis mine}


Charles Spurgeon: On Isaiah 45:22

“Turn to me and be saved, all the ends of the earth! For I am God, and there is no other.” Isaiah 45:22

“First, to whom does God tell us to look for salvation? O, does it not lower the pride of man, when we hear the Lord say, ‘Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth?’ It is not, ‘Look to your priest, and be ye saved:’ if you did, there would be another god, and beside him there would be some one else. It is not, ‘Look to yourself;’ if so, then there would be a being who might arrogate some of the praise of salvation. But it is ‘Look unto me.’ How frequently you who are coming to Christ look to yourselves. ‘O!’ you say, ‘I do not repent enough.’ That is looking to yourself. ‘I do not believe enough.’ That is looking to yourself. ‘I am too unworthy.’ That is looking to yourself. ‘ I cannot discover,’ says another, ‘that I have any righteousness.’ It is quite right to say that you have not any righteousness; but it is quite wrong to look for any. It is, ‘Look unto me.’ God will have you turn your eye off yourself and look unto him. The hardest thing in the world is to turn a man’s eye off himself; as long as he lives, he always has a predilection to turn his eyes inside, and look at himself; whereas God says, ‘Look unto me.'”

Charles Spurgeon in his sermon, Sovereignty and Salvation.


“There is nothing in this Bible which is unimportant.”

Charles Spurgeon in his sermon, The Bible.


“We, who are the advocates of the truth, are often very poor pleaders; we spoil our cause by the words we use; but it is a mercy that the brief is in the hand of a special pleader, who will advocate successfully, and overcome the sinner’s opposition.”

Charles Spurgeon in his sermon, The Comforter.

Isn’t it amazing how the Holy Spirit uses the fumbled words of our awkward attempts to explain the glorious gospel to penetrate the hearts of men.